August 14, 1806
William Clark

Set out at Sunrise and proceeded on.  when we were opposit the Minetares Grand Village [See October 26-27, 1804.] we Saw a number of the Nativs viewing of   we derected the Blunderbuses fired Several times, Soon after we Came too at a Croud of the nativs on the bank opposit the Village of the Shoe Indians or Mah-har-ha's at which place I saw the principal Chief of the Little Village of the Menitarre [Black Moccasin; See October 29, 1804.] & the principal Chief of the Mah-har-has. [White Buffalo Robe Unfolded; See October 29, 1804.]  those people were extreamly pleased to See us.  the Chief of the little Village of the Menetarias cried most imoderately, I enquired the Cause and was informed it was for the loss of his Son who had been killed latterly by the Blackfoot Indians. [Biddle, in later conversations with Clark, expands on the death of Black Moccasin's son.]  after a delay of a fiew mnits I proceeded on to the black Cats [NB: Mandan] Village [See October 29, 1804 for further information regarding Black Cat.] on the N.E. Side of the Missouri where I intended to Encamp ub the Sand blew in Such a manner that we deturmined not to continu on that Side abut return to the Side we had left.   here we were visited by all the inhabitants of this village [Rooptahee, or Ruptare Village.] who appeared equally as well pleased to See us as those above. I walked up to the Black Cats village & eate some Simnins [Summer Squash; See October 27, 1804.] with him, and Smoked a pipe   this Village I discovered had been rebuilt Since I left it and much Smaller than it was;  on enquirey into the Cause was informed that a quarrel had taken place and [NB: a number of]  Lodges had removed to the opposd. Side. I had Soon as I landed despatched Shabono to the Minetarras inviting the Chiefs to visit us, & Drewyer down to the lower Village of the Mandans [Matootonha, or Mitutanka Village.] to ask Mr. Jessomme [Rene Jusseaume, See October 27, 1804.] to Come and enterpret for us.   Mr. Jessomme arived and I spoke to the chiefs of the Village [Black Cat.] informing them that we Spoke to them as we had done when we were with them last and we now repeeted our envitation to the principal Chiefs of all the villages to accompany us and to the U States &c. &c.  the Black Cat Chief of the Mandans, Spoke and informed me that he wished to Visit the United States and his Great Father but was afraid of the Scioux who were yet at war with them and had killed Several of their men Since we had left them, and were on the river below and would Certainly kill <this> him if he attempted to go down.  I indeavered to do away with his objections by informig him that we would not Suffer those indians to hurt any of our red Children who Should think proper to accompany us, and on their return they would be equally protected, and their presents which would be very liberal, with themselves, Conveyed to their own Country at the expence of the U. States &c. &c.  The chief promised us Some corn tomorrow.  after the Council I directed the CAnoes to cross the river to a brook opposit where we Should be under the wind and in a plain where we would be Clear of musquetors &c.  after Crossing the Chief of the Mah har has told me if I would Send with him he would let me have some corn. I directed Sergt Gass & 2 men to accompany him t his Village, they Soon returned loaded with Corn.  the Chief and his wife also came down.  I gave his wife a fiew Needles &c.--   The Great Chif of all the Menitarres the one eye [Le Borgne, or One Eye; See March 9, 1805.] Came to Camp also Several other Chiefs of the different Villages. I assembled all the Chiefs on a leavel Spot on the band and Spoke to them &   see next book. [The next book begins with the date August 15, 1806, but continues with the same conference with the chiefs.]

August 14, 1806
John Ordway

a fair morning    we Set out eairly and procd. on     about 9 A.M. we arived at our old neighbours the Grousevauntaus [Hidatsa Indians.] and Mandans.   we Saluted them by firing our Swivvel and blunderbusses a number of times   they answered us with a blunderbuss and Small arms and were verry glad to See us   we halted a Short time at the Grousevauntaus village then mooved down donvenient to boath the Grousevauntaus and Mandans and Campd. [On the west side of the Missouri River and below the first (or Lower) Mandan village, Matootonha, or Mitutanka.] in order to Stay 2 or 3 days to try to git Some of these chiefs to do down with us to Show them the power of the untied States &C.   they gave us corn & beans &C. &C.  Capt. Lewis fainted as Capt. Clark was dressing his wound, but Soon came too again.-- [Only Ordway records Lewis fainting.]

August 14, 1806
Patrick Gass

The morning of this day was pleasant, and we embarked early.  In a short time we arrived near to our old friends the Grossventres and Mandans; and fixed our encampment in a central position [Probably on the west side of the Missouri below the first, or lower, Mandan village, Mitutanka.], so as to be most convenient to the different villages.  The inhabitants of all the villages appeared very glad to see us, and sent us presents of corn, beans and squashes.