May 03, 1806
Meriwether Lewis

This morning we set out at 7 A. M. steered N. 25 E 12 ms. to Kimooenem Creek [Tucannon River, Washington. The route appears as a dotted line on Clark's map.  The Tucannon River reaches the Snake in northwest Columbia County. See October 13, 1805.] through a high level plain.  this creek is about 12 yds. wide pebbly bottom low banks and discharges a considerable body of water   it heads in the S. W. mountains and discharges itself into Lewis's river a few miles above the narrows.   the bottoms of this creek are narrow with some timber principally Cottonwood and willow.    the under brush such as mentioned on N. East Creek. [Either Touchet River or Patit Creek.]   the hills are high and abrupt.   the land of the plains is much more fertile than below, less sand and covered with taller grass; very little of the aromatic shrubs appear in this part of the plain. [It is characterized by perennial bunchgrasses, such as Bluebunch Wheatgrass, Agrophron spicatum, Idaho Fescue, Festuca idahoensis and Sandberg Bluegrass.]    we halted and dined at this creek; after which we again proceeded N. 45 E. 3 M. through the high plain to a small creek [Pataha Creek, not named on Clark's map.] 5 yds. wide branch of the Kimooenem C.   this stream falls into the creek some miles below.   the hills of this creek like those of the Kimooenem are high it's bottoms narrow and possess but little timber, lands of a good quality, a dark rich loam.  we continued our rout up this creek, on it's N. side, N. 75 E. 7 Ms.   the timber increases in quantity the hills continue high.   East 4 Ms. up the creek.   here we met with We-ark-koomt [Weahkoonut] [Alvin Josephy & James Ronda:  His real name was Apash Wyakaikt, "flint necklace."  Men of the same name, very likely his son and grandson, were later among the most prominent Nez Perce leaders, known to whites as Looking Glass, senior and junior.  The last was a leading figure in the 1877 war, in which he was killed.] whom we have usually distinguished by the name of the bighorn Cheif from the circumstance of his always wearing a horn of that animal suspended by a cord to he [his] left arm.   he is the 1st Cheif of a large band of the Chopunnish nation.    he had 10 of his young men with him.   this man went down Lewis's river by land as we decended it by water last fall quite to the Columbia and I beleive was very instrumental in procuring us a hospitable and friendly reception among the natives.    he had now come a considerable distance to meet us.   after meeting this cheif we continued still up the creek bottoms N. 75 E. 2 m to the place at which the road leaves the creek and ascends the hills to the plain   here we encamped [On Pataha Creek east of Pataha City, near U.S. Highway 12 at about the point where the creek turns from a northerly to a westerly course.] in small grove of cottonwood tree which in some measure broke the violence of the wind.    we came 28 ms. today.   it rained hailed snowed and blowed with great violence the greater portion of the day.  it was fortunate for us that this storm was from the S. W. and of course on our backs.   the air was very cold.   we divided the last of our dryed meat at dinner when it was consumed as well as the ballance of our dogs nearly    we made but a scant supper and had not anything for tomorrow;  however We-ark-koomt consoled us with the information that there was an indian lodge on the river at  no great distance where we might supply ourselves with provision tomorrow.   our guide and the three young Wallahwollahs left us this morning reather abruptly and we have seen nothing of them since. the S. W. mountains appear to become lower as they proceede to the N. E.    this creek [Pataha Creek.] reaches the mountains.   we are nearer to them than we were last evening

May 03, 1806
William Clark

This morning we St out at 7 A. M. Steared N. 25o E 12 m. to Kimoo e nimm Creek through a high leavel plain   this Creek is 12 yds. wide pebbly bottom low banks and discharges a Considerable quanty of water   it head in the S W. Mountains and discharges it Self into Lewis's river a fiew miles above the narrow.    the bottoms of this Creek is narrow with Some timber principally Cotton wood & Willow.   the under brush Such as mentioned in the N. E. Creek.    The hills are high and abrupt.   the lands of the plains is much more furtile than below, less Sand and Covered with taller grass; very little of the aramatic Shrubs appear in this part of the plain.   we halted and dined at this Creek.   after which we again proceeded N. 45o E. 3 mes. through a high plain to a Small Creek 5 yds. wide, a branch of the Kimooenimm Creek.   the hills of this Stream like those of the Ki moo enimm are high its bottoms narrow and possess but little timber.   the land of a good quallity dark rich loam.    we Continued our rout up this Creek on it's N. Side N. 75o E 7 mes.   the timber increas in quantity   the hills continue high.    we met with the We arh koont whome we have usially distinguished by the name of the big horn Chief from the circumstance of his always wareing a horn of that animal Suspended by a Cord to his left arm.   he is a 1st Chief of a large band of the Chopunnish Nation.   he had ten of his young men with him.    this man Went down Lewis's river by Land as we decended it by water last fall quite to the Columbia, and I believe was very instremental in precureing us a hospital and friendly reception among the nativs.   he had now come a Considerable distance to meet us.   after meeting this Cheif we Continued Still up the Creek bottoms N. 75o E. 2 m. to the place at which the roade leaves the Creek and assends the hil to the high plains:  here we Encamped in a Small grove of Cotton trees which in some meausre broke the violence of the wind.   we Came 28 miles today.   it rained, hailed, Snowed & blowed with Great Violence the greater portion of the day.   it was fortunate for us that this Storm was from the S. W. and of Course on our backs.   the air was very cold.   we devided the last of our dried meat at dinner when it was Consumed as well as the ballance of our Dogs nearly    we made but a Scant Supper, and had not any thing for tomorrow; however We-ark-koomt Consoled us with the information that there was an Indian Lodge on the river at no great distance where we might Supply our Selves with provisions tomorrow.    our Guide and the three young Wallah wallah's left us this morning reather abruptly and we have Seen nothing of them Sence.  the S W. Mountains [The Blue Mountains of Oregon.] appear to become lower as <we> they receed to the N E.  This Creek reaches the mountains.   we are much nearer to them than we were last evening.   they are Covered with timber and at this time Snow.

May 03, 1806
John Ordway

a little rain the later part of last night, and continues Showery and cold  a little hail & Snow intermixed.  one of the hunters horses broke his hobbles and got away.  about 7 we Set out  proceeded on over high plains and hills.   road bearing to the left from the branch. the wind blew verry high and cold   Showers of hail & rain  about noon we descended a hill.  came on an other large creek [Tucannon River, the party's Kimooenem] where we halted to dine on the last of our meat.  our hunters Came up had found the lost horse a long distance back the road.  our Indians went on this morning intending to git to the forks to day  considerable of Snow fell on the high hills Since yesterday.  we delayed about 1 hour & left the creek named ke-moo-e-nim Creek  ascended a high hill and procd. on over high plains.  crossed 2 creeks, and followed up the third creek [Pataha Creek]  the big horn chief [Lewis & Clark called him We-ark-koomt; his real name was Apash Wyakaikt, 'apaswahayqt, "flint necklace."] who we Saw at the big forks last fall met us   Several other Indians with him  he appeared verry glad to See us and turned back with us  we had considerable of hail & verry high winds.  in the evening we Camped [Pataha Creek, east of Pataha City] having made 28 miles this day, having nothing to eat bought the only dog the Indians had with them.   the air is very cold.--

May 03, 1806
Patrick Gass

We had a wet uncomfortable morning, and when the horses were collected one was found missing, and one of our hunters went back after him, while the rest of us continued our journey. This morning our guide and three of our other Indians went on ahead. We continued our rout about ten miles, when we struck a creek, having left the other entirely to our right; and halted. Our hunter came up with the horse. The wind was very high this forenoon, and rather cold for the season; with some rain. We continued about two hours and eat the last of our dried meat; and are altogether without other provisions, as our stock of dogs is exhausted, and we can kill no game in these plains. In the evening we met a chief and nine of his men, who appeared glad to see us. We encamped on a small branch or spring, as it was too far to go over the hills. The wind continued to blow hard and some snow showers fell in the afternoon.