September 17, 1805
William Clark

Course Dist &c. 17th Septr 1805 Sunday

S. 50o W. 12 miles over high knobs of the mountain  passed three Dreans to right and Encamped on one to the left. Springs at all those drians &. road emencely bad as usial, no Snow in the hollers  all the high knobs of the mounts Covered  passed on a Divideing ridge on which we had to Cross over emensely high Knobs.  roads bad   Killed a few Phesants only. Killd. a colt to eate.

Cloudy morning  our horses much Scattered which detained us untill one oClock P.M. at which time we Set out the falling Snow & Snow <falling> from the trees which kept us wet all the after noon  passed over Several high ruged Knobs and Several dreans & Springs passing to the right, & passing on the ridge devideing the waters of two Small rivers. [Possibly Gravey and Serpent Creeks.]  road excessively bad  Snow on the Knobs, no Snow in the vallies  Killed a fiew Pheasents which was not sufficient for our Supper which compelled us to kill Something.    a Coalt being the most useless part of our Stock he fell a Prey to our appetites.  The after part of the day fare, we made only 10 miles to day  two horses fell & hurt themselves very <well> much.  we Encamped on the top of a high Knob of the mountain at a run passing to the left. [Whitehouse says they camped at a "round deep Sinque hole full of water." The description fits a site on the first saddle east of Indian Grave Peak, ID.]  we proceed on as yesterday, & with dificulty found the road

September 17, 1805
John Ordway

Cloudy and cold  we went out to look for our horses  found Some of them much Scattered.  we did not find them all untill about 12 oClock at which time we Set out and proceeded on.  the Snow melted of[f] the timber. the trail verry rough  we came up and down bad Steep places of the Mountain, the afternoon clear and pleasant & warm. the Snow melted fast.  the water Stood on the trail over our mockns Some places Slippery. we assended a steep high rockey part of the Mountain high rocks and high pricipicies.  we Camped on this Mountain at a small creek and dry pine timber [Near Indian Grave Peak]   we being verry hungry oblidged us to kill another colt the last we had.   one of the hunters chased a bear up the Mountain but could not kill it. we hear wolves howl some distance a head.

September 17, 1805
Patrick Gass

Our horses scattered so much last night, that they were not collected until noon, at which time we began our march again. It was a fine day with warm sunshine, which melted the snow very fast on the south sides of the hills, and made the travelling very fatiguing and uncomfortable. We continued over high desert mountains, where our hunters could find no game, nor signs of any except a bear's tract which they observed to day -- At dark we halted at a spring on the top of a mountain; killed another colt, and encamped there all night.

September 17, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

cloudy and cold.  we went out to hunt our horses, but found them much Scatered.   the mare which owned the colt, which we killed, went back & led 4 more horses back to where we took dinner yesterday.  the most of the other horses found Scatd. on the mountain, but we did not find them all untill 12 oClock at which time we Set out and proceeded on.  the Snow lay heavy on the timber.  passed along a rough road up and down the mountains  descended down a Steep part of the moutn.  the afternoon clear & warm.  the Snow melted So that the water Stood in the trail over our mockasons in Some places.  verry Slippery bad travvelling for our horses.  we assended verry high mountains verry rockey.  Some bald places on the top of the mountn.  high rocks Standing up, & high precepices &c.  these motn. mostly covred with Spruce pine & bolsom fer timber.  crossed Several creeks or Spring runs in the Course of the day Came about [blank] miles this day, and Camped [East of Indian Grave Peak] at a Small branch on the mountain near a round deep Sinque hole full of water.  we being hungry obledged us to kill the other Sucking colt to eat.  one of the hunters chased a bear in a mountn. but killed nothing.  we expect that their is game near a head.  we her wolves howl & Saw Some deer Sign &c.

September 17, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We had a cold Cloudy morning, the Men were sent out to hunt our horses, they found them, but they were much scattered, The Mare whose colt we had kill'd Yesterday, went back to where we halted Yesterday, to refresh ourselves, (or eat portable Soup) and took 4 of our horses with her, the other of our horses were found scattered on the Mountain & the whole of them were not found 'till 12 oClock A.M.  We then set out, and proceeded on our Journey, the Snow laying heavy on the trees.  We passed along a rough path, which was up & down the Mountain; & descended a steep part of the same, In the afternoon the weather cleared away, & then it became clear and warm, the Snow melted fast, & the water stood in the trail over our Moccasins, & in some places it was very Slippy, the travelling was very bad for ourselves & horses, We ascended some very high mountains, & very rockey paths & many bare places on the Mountains & high Rocks Standing upright on them.--

These mountains were chiefly covered with Spruce pine, & balsam fir timber.   In the course of this day we crossed several Creek & Spring runs, lying in the hollows of the Mountains.  We came about 16 Miles this day, & encamped at a small branch on a Mountain; near a Round deep Sink hole which was full of water.  The party being all exceeding hungry we were obliged to kill a sucking Colt to subsist on.  One of our hunters went out hunting.  He chased a bear in a Mountain; but did not get a chance to kill it.  The Wolves howled very much in the night, & we saw some signs of deer, so that we expect that their is game to be had a head of where we are encamped.--