September 07, 1805
William Clark

A Cloudy & rainie day   the greater Part of the Day dark & Drisley we proceedd on down the river thro a Vallie   passed Several Small Runs on the <right left> [right] & 3 creeks on the <right> left    The Vallie from 1 to <three> 2 miles wide the Snow top mountains to our left, open hilley Countrey on the right.  Saw 2 horses left by the Indians    Those horses were as wild a Elk. One of our hunters Came up this morning without his horse, in the course of the night the horse broke loose & Cleared out--   we did not make Camp untill dark, for the want of a good place, one of our hunters did not join us this evening.  he haveing killed an elk packed his horse & could not overtake us

[Gary E. Moulton: Clark apparently mislabeled or drew in incorrectly some streams on Atlas map 68 above the camp of September 6. The stream labeled "West Fork of Clarks River" (today's West Fork Bitterroot River) is too far north according to his course and distance table (here found with the entry of September 9), which is more instructive for the day's route than the text. The true West Fork would be the first major stream on the east side beyond the camp of September 6, between the words "Hills" and "Pine" on the map ("Creek on the left" in the second course for the day and mislabeled "Nez Perce" by Coues). The creek in the next course would be either McCoy Creek or Tin Cup Creek, the latter according to Coues's interlineation.  Coues seems to be correct in identifying the creek in the next course as Rock Creek; it is the one Clark drew in as West Fork of Clarks River. Just above that (unnamed on the map) is present Lost Horse Creek, called Little Horse Creek by Coues. The party camped southwest of Grantsdale, MT on the east side of the Bitterroot River.]

September 07, 1805
John Ordway

a cloudy cold morning.  one of our hunters Stayed out all last night.  we set out eairly and proceeded on down the creek.  our hunter who Stayed out last night over took us  had lost his horse.  we passed over narrow plains larg pine and cotton timber along the creeks  high mountains a little to the Lard Side which is covred thick with Snow. one of our hunters killed two Deer. Some of the other hunters killed 1 goose 1 crain Several pheasants and a hawk.  we proceeded on  crossed Several Small creeks and runs  we had Several Showers of rain.  this valley gitting wide.  the plain Smooth & dry.  we came 18 miles this day and Camped on the bank of the Creek.--[On the Bitterroot River, southwest of Grantsdale.]

September 07, 1805
Patrick Gass

We set out early in a cloudy cool morning; and our hunters went on as usual. We proceeded down the creek, and in our way we were met by a hunter, who had not come in last night, and who had lost his horse. We halted at 12 o'clock, and one of the hunters killed 2 deer; which was a subject of much joy and congratulations. Here we remained to dine, and some rain fell. On the south of this place there are very high mountains convered with snow and timaber, and on the north prairie hills. After staying here 2 hours we proceeded on down the creek; found the country much the same as that which we had passed through in the forenoon; and having travelled about 20 miles since the morning, encamped for the night. The valley is become more extensive, and our creek has increased to a considerable river. Some rain fell in the afternoon, and our hunters killed two cranes on our way.

September 07, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

a cloudy cold morning.  we Set out eairly, and proceeded on down the creek [They traveled down the East Fork Bitterroot River to the junction with West Fork Bitterroot River (West Fork Clark's River to the party) and on down the Bitterroot (Clark's) River.]   our hunter came up who Stayed out last night.  had lost his horse.  we proceeded on over a plain.  the bottoms narrow and considerable of timber large pine and cotton along the creek high mountains [The Bitterroot Mountains on the Montana-Idaho border.] on the Side of the creek which are covred with pitch pine. Some of the highest are covred thick with Snow. one of our hunters killed 2 Deer, which revived us.  Some of the hunters killed a goose & a crain [Most likely a sandhill crane.] Several fessents and a hawk.  Several Small Showers of rain in the course of the day.  the valley gitting wider the creek larger.  the plain Smooth and dry.  the Soil verry indifferent.  we Came 18 miles this day and Camped [Southeast of Grantsdale, MT on the east side of the Bitterroot.] on the bank of the Creek.  we passed Several creeks and branches [McCoy, Tin Cup, Rock, and Lost Horse creeks - See Clark's entry for the day.] which run into the main creek this day.  one of our hunters did not join us this evening.   a little rain.  our course this day is generally N. west.

September 07, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We had a cold, Cloudy morning.--  We set out early and proceeded on, we went down the Creek that we had encamped on.  The hunter that was out last night returned to us, he had lost his horse, & had killed no game.  We proceeded on, and crossed a plain.  the bottoms along the Creek are narrow, and had a considerable quantity of Pine & Cotton Wood trees growing on it.  On the South side of this Creek, lies high Mountains, which are covered with Pitch Pine.  One of our hunters came to us, and had killed 2 deer, Some others of the Hunters also came to us, & had killed 1 Goose 1 Crane several ferrets [The copyist's error. He meant "fessents" as in the first entry, for phesants, otherwise grouse.] & a hawk all of which they brought with them.--

Our party seemed revived at the success that the hunters had met with, however in all the hardship that they had yet undergone they never once complained, trusting to Providence & the Conduct of our Officers in all our difficulties.  We had several small showers of Rain in the course of the day.  As we pursued our Journey we found the Valleys getting wider & the Creek larger & the plain smooth & dry, but the Soil very indifferent.  We came 18 Miles this day, and encamped on the bank of the same Creek, that we had encamped on Yesterday.  We passed during this days Journey several Creeks, & branches which run into this creek where we now are.--  One of our hunters did not join us this evening, our course during this day has been generally North West.--