July 28, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

... we called the S.W. fork, that which we meant to ascend, Jefferson's River in honor of that illustrious personage Thomas Jefferson. [the author of our enterprize.] the Middle fork we called Madison's River in honor of James Madison, and the S.E. Fork we called Gallitin's River in honor of Albert Gallitin. ... the beds of all these streams are formed of smooth pebble and gravel, and their waters perfectly transparent; in short they are three noble streams.

I had a small bower or booth erected for the comfort of Capt. C.

this affords one of the best winter pastures on earth for horses or cows, and of course will be much in favour of an establishment should it ever be thought necessary to fix one at this place.

Our present camp is precisely on the spot that the Snake Indians were encamped at the time the Minnetares of the Knife R. first came in sight of them five years since. from hence they retreated about three miles up Jeffersons river and concealed themselves in the woods, the Minnetares pursued, attacked them, killed 4 men 4 women a number of boys, and mad[e] prisoners of all the females and four boys, Sah-cah-gar-we-ah o[u]r Indian woman was one of the female prisoners taken at that time; tho' I cannot discover that she shews any immotion of sorrow in recollecting this event, or of joy in being again restored to her native country ; if she has enough to eat and a few trinkets to wear I beleive she would be perfectly content anywhere.

July 28, 1805
John Ordway

a foggy morning, but clear after.  Several men went out a hunting.   we put out the baggage to air.  Capt. Clark Sick.   we built a bower for his comfort.   the party though much fatigued are engaged dressing Skins to make themselves cloaths and mockasons &C.   towards evening the hunters all returned    had killed 7 or 8 deer and 2 Elk.  Some of the buck deer were fat.   one of the hunters who had been up the South fork a Short distance, and found it not so large as the West & N. forks.   we conclude to proceede up the North fork to the Mountains.   towards evening we had a fine Shower of rain   Some Thunder attended it which cooled the air verry much.   the men at Camp all employed dressing their Skins &C.--   rushes along here. [Sand Rush or Scouring Rush, Equisetum hyemale.]

July 28, 1805
Patrick Gass

As this was a fine day, the men were employed in airing the baggage, dressing skins and hunting.  Capt. Clark still continued unwell.  Our squaw informed us, that it was at this place she had been taken prisoner by the Grossventers 4 or 5 years ago. [See Lewis's entry for this day.]  From this valley we can discover a large mountain with snow on it, towards the southwest [The Tobacco Root Mountains.]; and expect to pass by the northwest end of it.  Capt. Lewis had a meridian altitude here, which gave 45o 22 34.5" north latitude.  We also remained here the 29th, which was a fine day, and the men chiefly employed in the same way.  Capt. Clarke is getting better.

July 28, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

a foggy morning but clear.  Several men went out eairly a hunting.   we put out all the baggage to air.  Capt Clark verry unwell.   we built a bowrey for his comfort.   the party in general much fatigued.  Several lame, with Sore feet &c.  towards evening the hunters all returned.  had killed 7 or 8 Deer Some of them fat bucks.  one of them who had been a Short distance up the South fork & found it not as large as the middle or west & North forks, which are near of a Size.  in the evening we had a fine Shower of rain.  Some Thunder attended it, which cooled the air much.   the men at Camp has employed themselves this day in dressing Skins, to make cloathing for themselves.  I am employed makeing the chief part of the cloathing for the party.   two Elk killed to day also--

July 28, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We had some fog early this morning, but it cleared away at Sun rise, & the weather was pleasant, several of our party went out a hunting, and the remainder was employed in Airing the Baggage &ca.--  Captain Clarke continued still very sick,--    part of our Men were taken off, from the Baggage &ca. in order to build a bowry, for his accomodation <of Captain Clark>, which they soon compleated,--   The Men that were hawling the Boats along with the tow lines, for several days past are much fataigued; & some of them lame from Cuts they got in their feet in passing rockey & stoney parts of the Shores.--  Towards the evening the party that had went out hunting returned.  They had killed 8 Deer, some of which were very fat.   One of that party mentioned that he had been up the North, & West (or middle fork of the river Mesouri,) and mentioned that those two rivers, appeared to him to be nearly one width.  In the evening, we had a fine shower of rain, accompanied with Thunder, which cooled the Air, & made it very pleasant, The Men at our Camp, were <Airing> employed in drying the Baggage &ca <was drying, employed themselves in> & dressing of Skins to make themselves Cloathing.--  I was employed in making chief part of the Cloathing for the whole party.--  Our Hunters killed also 2 Elk, which was brought into our Camp.--