July 27, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

(at junction of S.W. and Middle forks)

beleiving this to be an essential point in the geography of this western part of the Continent I determined to remain at all events untill I obtained the necessary data for fixing it's latitude Longitude &c. ... to call either of these streams the Missouri would be giving it a preference w[h]ich it's size dose not warrant as it is not larger then the other.

at 3 P.M. Capt Clark arrived very sick with a high fever on him and much fatiegued and exhausted. he informed me that he was very sick all last night had a high fever and frequent chills & constant aking pains in all his mustles. ... Capt. C. thought himself somewhat bilious and had not had a passage for several days; I prevailed on him to take a doze of Rushes pills, which I have always found sovereign in such cases and to bath his feet in warm water and rest himself.

we begin to feel considerable anxiety with rispect to the Snake Indians. if we do not find them or some other nation who have horses I fear the successfull issue of our voyage will be very doubtfull or at all events much more difficult in it's accomplishment. we are now several hundred miles within the bosom of this wild and mountanous country, where game may rationally be expected shortly to become scarce and subsistence precarious without any information with rispect to the country not knowing how far these mountains continue, or wher to direct our course to pass them to advantage or intersept a navigable branch of the Columbia, or even were we on such an one the probability is that we should not find any timber within these mountains large enough for canoes if we judge from the portion of them through which we have passed. however I still hope for the best, and intend taking a tramp myself in a few days to find these yellow gentlemen if possible. my two principal consolations are that from our present position it is impossible that the S.W. fork can head with the waters of any other river but the Columbia, and that if any Indians can subsist in the form of a nation in these mountains with the means they have of acquiring food we can also subsist.

July 27, 1805
William Clark

I continue to be verry unwell fever verry high, take 5 rushes pills & bathe my feet & legs in hot water

July 27, 1805
John Ordway

a clear morning.   we Set off as usal and proceeded on.   the current Swift as usal.   passed clifts of rocks.   villages of little birds under the Shelveing rocks. [Bank Swallow, Riparia riparia.]   the hills not So high as below.   the currents abound along the Shores.   about 9 oClock we arived at the three forks of the Missourie [The party remained here until July 30.], which is in open view of the high Mountains covered in some places with Snow.   Saw large flocks of Mountain Sheep or Ibex and antelopes &C. on the plain.   we passed the South & west forks, and Camped at an old Indian Camp on the point a Short distance up the North fork.   this is a handsom pleasant plain considerable of cotton timber about the points of the forks.    we unloaded the canoes.  Several men went out in the bottoms to hunt.   Capt. Clark joined us and the men who were with him.   he informed us that he had been about 40 miles up the west fork and over to the North fork and came down that to the forks.   they had killed several deer antelopes and a cub bear.   Capt Clark verry unwell.  he had Seen a large elagant horse in the plains which appeared to be verry wild.   the hunters killed Several or 6 deer, and 3 otter and a musk rat.   we had a Shower of rain this afternoon.   came 7 mls. to day, which brought us to this Camp where we intent to rest a day or two.    we expected to have found the Snake nation of Indians at this place, but as we expect they are further up the River, or perhaps they are gone over the mountains to the Columbian River [Ordway means a branch of the Columbia River, in this case the Lemhi River. At this time any river "over the mountains" was referenced as the Columbia River.] on the other side to fish &. C.   this is the place where our Intrepters wife was taken prisoner by the Grossvauntars, about 4 years ago, &C. [It is believed Sacagawea was captured by Hidatsa (Gros Ventres) about 1800.]

July 27, 1805
Patrick Gass

We continued our voyage early, and had a pleasant morning, proceeded on, and at 9 o'clock got through the small mountain.  At the entrance of the valley, a branch of the Missouri comes in on the south side, about 60 yards wide; the current rapid but not very deep.  Here we took breakfast, and having proceeded on a mile, came to another branch of the same size.  There is very little difference in size of the 3 branches. [The Three Forks of the Missouri: Gallatin, Madison and Jefferson.]  On the bank of the north branch [The Jefferson] we found a note Captain Clarke had left informing us, he was ahead and had gone up that branch.  We went on to the point, and, as the men were much fatigued, encamped in order to rest a day or two. [Between two branches of the Jefferson, on later Barkers Island, northeast of the town of Three Forks, MT.]  After we halted here, it began to rain and continued three hours.  About 12 o'clock Capt. Clarke and his men [Charbonneau, Joseph and Reubin Fields and Frazier.] came to our encampment, and told us they had been up both branches [The Jefferson and Madison.] a considerable distance, but could discover none of the natives.  There is a beautiful valley at these forks; and a good deal of timber on the branches, chiefly cotton-wood. Also currants, goose and service berries [Serviceberry, Amerlanchier alnifolia.], and choak-cherries on the banks. The deer are plenty too; some of the men went out and killed several to-day. Capt. Clarke was very unwell and had been so all last night. In the evening the weather became clear and we had a fine night.

July 27, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

a clear morning.   we Set off at Sun rise and proceeded on.   the current as rapid as yesterday.   passed clifts of rocks where was villages of little birds under the Shelving rocks &c. [Bank Swallow, Riparia riparia.]   the hills not So high as below.   the currents of different kinds abound along the Shores.   about 9 oClock we Came or arived at the 3 forks of the Missourie which is in a <wide> valley in open view of the high Mountains which has white Spots on it which has the appearence of Snow.  Saw large flocks of mountain Sheep or Ibex, and goats or antelopes.   the plain on N. Side of the forks has lately been burned over by the natives.  we went on passed the South fork, and west fork.   went a Short distance up the North fork and Camped on the point which is a Smoth plain.   a large Camp of Indians has been encamped here Sometime ago.   our Intrepters wife was taken prisoner at this place 3 or 4 years ago by the Gross vauntous Indians.  their came up Showers of rain which lasted untill evening.   Capt. Clark & men returned & Joined us.  had found no Indians, but had Seen fresh Sign of horses.  Saw one elegant horse in the plains which appeared wild.    they had been about 40 miles up the middle or west fork then Struck across the plains to the North fork, and was near the mountains, and informed us that their is considerable of Snow on them.  our hunters killed in these bottoms in the forks of the Rivers, 6 Deer 3 otter & a musk rat.  Capt. Clark & party had killed Several Deer goats or antelopes and a young bear.  this is a verry pleasant handsome place, fine bottoms of timber &c.  we expected to have found the Snake nation of Indians about this place, but as they are gone we expect they are gone over the mountains to the River called the Columbian River, to fish &c. [As did Ordway, Whitehouse uses the term "Columbia River" broadly. Here it is the Lemhi River, a distant branch of the Columbia.]  but perhaps we may find Some this Side of the mountains yet.   we Came only 7 miles to day.  at this Camp we unloaded all the canoes & conclude to rest & refresh ourselves a day or too &c. Capt. Clark taken Sick.--

July 27, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

A Clear morning, We set off early, and proceeded on; the current was as rapid as it was Yesterday, we passed some Clifts of rocks, where there was a quantity of small bird's nests, built under the shelving rocks.  The hills were not so high, as they had been some distance below.  We found currants of different kinds in abundance, growing along the shores of the River.--  At 9 o'Clock A.M. we arrived at the three forks of the Mesouri River, which lays in a Valley, in open View of the high mountains, which have white spots on them, and has the appearance of being Snow.--  We saw on the Hills large flocks of mountain Sheep (or Ibex) and flocks of Antelopes.--  The plain lying on the North side of those 3 forks, had been burnt by the natives, We proceeded on, and passed the South and West forks of the Mesouri River; and went a short distance up the North fork, & encamped on the Point, which is a large smooth plain--  We found here a large Camp, where the Indians had been encamped sometime past.--  Our Indian woman (Interpreter) informed us that she was taken prisoner at this place between 3 & 4 Years ago, but a party of the Gross Vaunter (or big Belley) Indians who had carried her away to their nation

We had showers of rain that continued till the evening.--  Captain Clark and the party that was with him returned; and joined us here.--   they informed us, that they had seen no Indians, but that they had come across fresh tracts of horses, and had seen one of the horses, which was elegant, they found this Horse in the plains and he appeared to them to be perfectly wild--  They also mentioned that they had been 40 Miles from the best calculation up the Middle or West fork of the River, and then had struck across the plains to the North fork, and had been near the Mountains, and that there was a considerable quantity of snow on them.--  Our hunters killed in the forks of these Rivers 6 deer, 3 Otters, and a muskrat, Captain Clarke & his party had killed several deer, Antelope, and a Young bear since they had left us.--  The forks that we are present at, is a most delightful situated place, and exceeds any that we have yet seen, it affording a most delightfull prospect, the land extreamly rich & fertile; and the bottoms large and well timbered, and to all appearance must be healthy,--    and may be called the paradice of the Mesouri River.  We expected to have found the Snake Nation of Indians here, but they being gone, we now expect that they are gone over the Mountains, to the Columbia River to fish.--  The party here are of opinion, that they may find some of those Indians, yet; on this side of the Mountains.   We came only 7 Miles this day; to where we are encamp'd   We unloaded all the Canoes this day.--

Our officers concluded on the party staying here, for some days; in order to refresh themselves.--  Captain Clark was this day taken Ill, which was supposed to be occasioned by fataigue.--