July 25, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

... we saw a large brown bear on an island ... Charbono gave out, one of his ankles failed him and he was unable to proceede any further.

July 25, 1805
John Ordway

a clear morning.   we Set out as usal and proceeded on.  Saw a large white bear on an Island.   we Saw a flock of goats or antelopes     one of the hunters killed one of them.   we passed a Camp where Capt. Clark had Stayed all night. [Clark's camp of July 23, according to Lewis, near Toston, MT.]   we discover Mountains a head which have Spots of Snow on them.   passed a large dry plain on S. Side, in the afternoon we passed high rough rocky hills & clifts of rocks.   at the entrence we found bad rapids, and Shallow rocks sticking up all the way across.  Saw excelent Springs along the Shore on Larbord Side.  Saw Some excelent Springs, which ran from under the clifts of rocks.  Came 16 miles this day and Camped on the Stard. Side. [Above Toston Dam. The camp is misdated July 24 on Clark's map.]   our hunter killed one goose which was all the game killed to day.--

July 25, 1805
Patrick Gass

We embarked and proceeded on at the usual time, in a fine morning; we passed a beautiful plain on the north side, and at 2 o'clock we came to the entrance of another chain of mountains ["Little Gates of the Mountains" as they were labeled by Clark; between Toston and Lombard, MT.]; where we took dinner and again went on.  Passing through this chain we found some difficult rapids, but good water between them.  This chain of mountains are not so high, nor so rocky as those we passed before.  Six very fine springs rise on the southern shore, about four miles above the entrance of this range.  We went 16 miles and encamped on the north side.

July 25, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

a clear pleasant morning.   we Set out as usal and proceeded on.  Saw a large white bear on an Island.  Saw a nomber of otter.   Saw a flock of goats or antelopes one of the hunters killed one of them.  we Saw a Camp where Capt. Clark had Stayed one night.  discovered mountains a head which appear to have Snow on them, if not Snow it must be verry white Clay or rocks.  we eat abundance of red & yallow currents.   the timber Island not So pleanty as yesterday.--    large plains on each Side of the River & looks pleasant and extensive.    in the afternoon we entered in to Some rough rockey hills  ["Little Gates of the Mountains" as they were labeled by Clark; between Toston and Lombard, MT.] which we expect from the Indian account is the commencement of the Second chain of the rockey mountains, but they do not appear So high as the first nor So Solid a rock.  at the entrence we found Several bad rockey rapids which we had to pass through and So Shallow the rocks Show themselves across the River and appear Shallow all the way across.   we double manned and got up Safe.  I cut my foot with the Stone a towing along the Shore.  Saw excelent Springs which ran from under the clifts.   we came 16 miles this day and Camped on the N.S. [Above Toston Dam.]  our hunter killed one goose, which was all that was killed this day--

July 25, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

This morning clear & pleasant, we set out as usual, and proceeded on our Voyage, and on an Island saw a large White or brown bear, & in the River numbers of Otters, and a flock of Antelopes on the Shore one of which our hunters killed.--  We passed by a Camp, where Captain Clarke had staid all night, We discover'd Mountains lying ahead of us, which has the appearance of Snow being on them, from their white Colour, we still found abundance of Red & Yellow currants.  We did not find the Islands or timber so plenty, as it was Yesterday.  We found large extensive plains lying on both sides of the River, which had a pleasant appearance.  In the afternoon we <enter'd into> passed some rough rockey hills, which we expect from the account we have from the Indian Woman that is with us, to be the commencement of the Second chain of the Rockey Mountains; but they do not appear, to be so high, as the first chain of Mountains which we have passed, nor so solid a rock at the entrance of them.--  We found several bad rockey Rapids, which we had to pass through, and <are> the Water was so shallow that the Rocks appeared above the Water almost across the River, We double manned our Canoes, and with difficulty got over them, by hard towing; We saw several excellent springs, which came out form under the Clifts of Rocks, near the River, We came 16 Miles this day, & encamped on the North side of the River.--

The men were very much fataigued towing the Canoes this day, and some of them had their feet Cut in passing over the Rocks.--  Our hunters only killed one Goose, which was all that was killed this day.--