May 14, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

... the bear pursued and had very nearly overtaken them before they reached the river; ... in this manner he pursued two of them seperately so close that they were obliged to throw aside their guns and pouches and throw themselves into the river altho' the bank was nearly twenty feet perpendicular; so enraged was this anamal that he plunged into the river only a few feet behind the second man he had compelled [to] take refuge in the water, when one of those who still remained on shore shot him through the head and finally killed him; ... they found eight balls had passed through him in different directions; ... It happened unfortunately for us this evening that Charbono was at the helm of this Perogue, in stead of Drewyer, who had previously steered her; Charbono cannot swim and is perhaps the most timid waterman in the world; ... in short almost every article indispensibly necessary to further the views, or insure the success of the enterprize in which we are now launched ... when a sudon squawl of wind struck her obliquely, and turned her considerably, the steersman allarmed, in stead of puting, her before the wind, lufted her up into it, the wind was so violent that it drew the brace of the squarsail out of the hand of the man who was attending it, and instantly upset the perogue and would have turned her completely topsaturva, had it not have been from the resistance mad[e] by the oarning against the water; ...the perogue then wrighted but had filled within an inch of the gunwals; Charbono still crying to his god for mercy, had not yet recollected the rudder, nor could the repeated orders of the Bowsman, Cruzat, bring him to his recollection untill he threatend to shoot him instantly if he did not take hold of the rudder and do his duty, ... had I undertaken this project therefore, there was a hundred to one but what I should have paid the forfit of my life for the madness of my project, but this had the perogue been lost, I should have valued but little. ... accordingly took a drink of grog and gave each man a gill of sperits.

May 14, 1805
William Clark

... the articles which floated out was nearly all caught by the Squar who was in the rear.

May 14, 1805
John Ordway

a hard white frost last night.  our mocassons froze near the fire.   a clear and pleasant morning.   we Set off at Sun rise.   proceeded on     passed the mouth of a creek on N.S. [Probably Gibson's Creek after expedition member George Gibson, todays Sutherland Creek.]    passed black bluffs which make near the River on each Side.   high hills back from the river   Some pitch pine on them.  Saw verry large gangs of buffaloe    about 11 oClock we passed the Mouth of a large Creek on the S.S. called [blank] [Possibly Stick Lodge Creek or Brown Bear Defeated Creek of the expedition, todays Hell Creek and Snow Creek.]   we proceeded on about 12 oC.   it was verry war[m] or much warmer than it has been before this Spring.   we Saw Some banks of snow laying in the vallies at the N.S. of the hills.   about one oClock we halted to dine at a bottom on the S.S. Capt. Clark killed a buffaloe.   about 3 oC. we proceeded on.  Capt. Lewis and Capt. Clark crossed the River where we Saw a large gang of buffaloe & went on Shore    abt 4 oClock the men in the canoes Saw a large brown bear on the hills on S. S.   6 men went out to kill it.   they fired at it and wounded it.   it chased 2 of them into a canoe, and anoth[er] [into?] the River and they Steady fireing at him.   after Shooting eight balls in his body Some of them through the lites [lungs], he took the River and was near catching the Man he chased in, but he went up against the Stream and the bear being wounded could not git to him.   one of the hunters Shot him in the head which killed him dead.   we got him to Shore with a canoe and butchred him.    we found him to be nearly the Same discription of the first we killed only much larger.   about 5 oClock the white perogue of the Captains was Sailing a long, there came a violent gust of wind from the N.W. which was to the contrary to the course they were Sailing.   it took the Sail and before they had time to douse it it turned the perogue down on one Side So that she filled with water, and would have turned over had it not been for the earning [awning] which prevented it.   with much a diew they got the Sail in and got the [pirogue] to Shore and unlaoded hir at a bottom where we camped on N.S.   came 18 1/2 miles this day   one man wounded another b. bear.

May 14, 1805
Patrick Gass

There was some white frost in the morning, we proceeded on early; passed black hills close to the river on the South side and some covered with pine timber at a distance.   About 12 the day became warm.  Banks of snow were seen lying on the hills on the North side.  This forenoon we passed a large creek [Probably the expeditions Gibson's Creek, after George Gibson, now Sutherland Creek.] on the North side and a small river on the South. [Probably the expeditions Stick Lodge Creek, now Hell Creek.]  About 4 in the afternoon we passed another small river [The expedition's Brown Bear Defeated Creek, now Snow Creek.] on the South side near the mouth of which some of the men discovered a large brown bear, and six of them went out to kill it. They fired at it; but having only wounded it, it made battle and was near seizing some of them, but they all fortunately escaped, and at length succeeded in dispataching it.  These bears are very bold and ferocious; and very large and powerful. The natives say they have killed a number of their brave men.   The periogues having gone ahead, while the people belonging to the canoes were dressing the bear, a sudden gust of wind arose, which overset one of the periogues before the sail could be got down.  The men who had been on board, turned it again and got it to shore, full of water.  It was immediately unloaded and the cargo opened, when we found a great part of the medicine, and other articles spoiled.  Here we encamped, having come to day 18 1/2 miles.

May 14, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

a hard white frost last night.  our mocasons froze near the fire.   a clear and pleasant morning.   we Set off at Sun rise and proceeded on    passed the mouth of a large creek [Gibson's Creek, after George Gibson of the expedition, now Sutherland Creek.  For some unexplained reason the copyist calls it "Whitehouses Creek".] on N.S. name [blank] and a Small willow Island abo. the mouth of Sd creek.  we Saw verry large gangs of buffaloe, on N.S.   high rough black hills on each Side of the River.  Some Spots of pitch pine on the hills on each Side of the River.   about 1 oC. we halted to dine at timbred bottom on the S.S.  Capt. Clark killed a buffaloe    about 2 oC. we proceeded.  (we had passed the mouth of a large creek [Stick Lodge Creek, now Hell Creek.] this fore noon at S.S.  Sergt. Gass Saw Some banks of Snow on the N.Side of Some hills.)   about 4 oClock P.M. we passed the mouth of a large creek [Brown Bear Defeated Creek, Now Snow Creek.]   on S.S. 100 yards wide at high water mark.   we proceeded on     at 5 oC. we Saw a verry large brown bear on the hills on S. S.   Six men went from the cannoes to kill him    they fired at him and only wounded him he took after them and chased 2 men in to a cannoe.   they Shoved off in the River and fired at him   Some of the men on Shore wounded him worse   he then chased one man down a Steep bank in to the River and was near gitting hold of him, but he kept up Stream So that the bear could not git up to him.    one of the men on Shore Shot the bear in the head, which killed him dead after having nine balls Shot in him.  we got him to Shore and butchered him.    his feet was nine Inches across the ball, and 13 in length, nearly of the Same description of the first we killed only much larger    his nales was Seven Inches long &c.  the two captains ware out on Shore after a verry large gang of buffaloe.   the white perogue of the captains hoisted Sail as the wind blew fair.   a violent Storm of wind arose from a black cloud in the N. W.    the wind shifted in N.W. and took the Sail of a Sudden and had it not been for the eairning [awning] and mast She would have turned up side down.   She filled ful of water    with much trouble they got her to Shore and unloaded hir.   found that the most of the loading was wet     the Medicine Spoiled or damaged very much   Some of the paper and nearly all the books got wet, but not altogether Spoiled.   we opened all the loading, on the bank and Camped at a bottom covred with timber on the N. S.  our officers gave each man a draghm of ardent Spirits,  Came 18 1/2 miles this day.--    (1 man wounded another bear).

May 14, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We had last night hard white frost, so that our Moccasins froze near the fire, the morning was clear and pleasant, We set off at sunrise, and proceeded on our Voyage; and passed a large Creek lying on the North side of the River which our Officers named Whitehouses Creek, opposite to this Creek, we passed a small Island covered with Willows, we saw this day very large gangs of buffalo,--  On the North side of the River, as we passed along; we saw high rough black hills, lying on both sides of the river,  About one o'Clock we halted to dine in a bottom, lying on the South side of the River, Captain Clark went out at this place to hunt, and killed a Buffalo, which was brought to us, about 2 o'Clock P.M. we set out; (We passed this forenoon, the Mouth of a large Creek lying on the South side of the Mesouri, 100 Yards wide at high water mark) and Sergeant Gass who was out hunting, saw some Banks of snow, on hills, lying on the North side of the River.--    at 4 oClock P.M. we passed another large Creek on the South side of the River also about 100 Yards wide, and saw a very large Brown bear on the hills, Six of our Men went from one of the Canoes in order to kill him,  They came near and fired at him, and only wounded the Animal.--  The bear on being wounded, took after the party and followed 2 of the Men so close that they took into one of our Canoes, and shoved her off from the Shore.  The Men in the Canoe discharged their Guns, as well as those Men on Shore at this bear, & wounded him again, and he then took after one of those Men who was on the Shore, and chased him down a steep bank, into the River, and was near getting hold of him.  The Man who was chased by the Bear, kept going up the Stream of the River, so that the bear could not overtake him.--  One of the Men on the Shore, shot the bear through the head, which killed him--  We had shot nine balls into this bear, before we killed him, The Men then got him to the Shore where they butcher'd him--   The feet of this bear was Nine Inches across the balls, and thirteen Inches in length,--   differing only from the first large bear that we killed, in having <toe> larger Nails; these being 7 Inches long.--  Our two Captains had gone ashore, after a very large Gang of buffalo that they had seen; when the Men on board of the Pettyauger that the Captains went in, hoisted Sail, (the Wind being fair) and set off; shortly after a Violent Storm came from a black Cloud, which lay in the Northwest, and the Wind shifting suddenly to that point; took the Pettyauger aback and had it not have been for the Awning & Mast, she must have turned upside down, The Pettyauger filled full of Water, and with much trouble they got her to the shore--and unloaded her, We found that the most part of her loading was wet, the Medicine damaj'd, & part of it Spoiled--

We also found some of the papers, and books had got wet, but not so much as to be spoiled.--  The Men that was with the Craft were all employed in unloading the Pettyauger, and opening the loading, in Order to dry it.--  We encamped in a bottom of timber lying on the North side of the River.  Our officers came to us, and the Men that were out, One of which had wounded a brown bear, We came 18 1/2 Miles this day.--