May 08, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

the water of this river possesses a peculiar whiteness, being about the colour of a cup of tea with the admixture of a tablespoonfull of milk. from the colour of it's water we called it Milk river.

May 08, 1805
William Clark

... the Squar Geathered on the sides of the hills wild Lickerish, & the white apple as called by the angegees [engages] and gave me to eat, ...

May 08, 1805
John Ordway

we Set off eairly.   it clouded up of a Sudden, and rained Some.    we Sailed on under a fine breeze from the East.   came 20 miles by one oClock, passed the mouth of a large River on N.S. Called Scolding or named milk River.    about 200 yards wide and deep, and 2100 miles from the mouth of the Missourie.--   we halted in a handsom bottom abo. the Mouth of Sd. River to dine.  Sergt. Pryor killed a Deer.   about 2 o.C we proceeded on     passed in the course of this day timbred bottoms on each Side of the river.   a little back from the River their is no timber but high beautiful plains on the N.S. and river hills on S.S.  Came 27 miles today and Camped in a handsom bottom covred with Groves of timber on the S.S.   one man Shot a large beaver.

May 08, 1805
Patrick Gass

We were again very early under way in a cloudy morning; about 12 some rain fell: at 2 we passed a handsome river on the North side about 200 yards wide called Milk river.   There is a good deal of water in this river which is clear, and its banks beautiful.  Our distance this day was about twenty-seven miles, and we encamped in a beautiful bottom on the South side.

May 08, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

we Set off eairly.   clouded up and rained Some  the current Swift.    we proceeded on under a fine breeze from the East, 20 miles by about 1 oClock    then we passed the mouth of a River on N.S. about 200 yards wide and verry deep.   it is 2100 miles from the mouth of the Missourie R. to the mouth of this River.   we named this River Scolding or milk River.--  [Still known as Milk River today.]   we halted on the point above the mouth to dine.  Some men went a Short distance up this River.   one of them killed a deer.   about 2 oC we proceeded on  passed handsom bottoms thinly covered with timber on the River and high beautiful high plains on the N.S. and River hills on the S.S.  Came 27 miles this day and Camped on a timbred bottom on the S.S.  one man killd. a beaver.   we Saw a Great deal of beaver Sign all Sorts of Game on each Side R

May 08, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We set off early this morning, shortly after the weather Clouded up and rained; we found the current of the River to run very strong against us; we proceeded on, and set our Sails, having a fine breeze of wind blowing from the East; we came 20 Miles by 10 o'Clock A.M. not withstanding we had so strong a current against us,--   and passed a River which emties itself into the Mesouri lying on the North side, this River <is> was about 200 Yards wide at its mouth, and <is> very deep.  The mouth of this River is 2,100 Miles distant from the Mouth of the Mesouri River, Our Officers gave this River the name, Scalding Milk River.--  We halted at a point above the Mouth of this River to dine, where Some of our party went a short distance up this River, and killed a deer which they brought to us.--

The party that went up Scalding Milk river mentioned, that the River continued its breadth and depth as high up as where they had been--the Water Clear, and deep; the banks tolerably high, and the land very rich, and the country fertile, being partly Priaries and some Skirts of woodland.--  At 2 o'Clock P.M. we proceeded on our Voyage, and passed some handsome River bottoms, thinly cover'd with Timber, and beautiful high plains, lying on the North side of the River; and hills lying along the river on the South side.--   We came too in the Evening, and encamped in a bottom with Timber; lying on the South side of the River   One of our party shortly after we encamped, went out a hunting, and killed One beaver, We have this day seen vast Signs of all kind of Game on both sides of the River, and beaver in particular, We came this day 27 Miles--