May 03, 1805
John Ordway

clear but verry cold for May.   we Set off about 7 oClock, & proceeded on.  Saw the Standing water froze Over  the Ice froze to oar poles as we poled where the sun Shined on us.   a hard white frost last night.   the ground covered with Snow.   the wind rose high from the W. about one o.C. Capt. Clark Came to us where we halted to dine    had killed an Elk, as he had been by land Since morning.   this place where he killed the Elk is in a bottom covered with c.w. timber.   we found a goose nest a little below this on some drift wood.   we took 3 Eggs out of it.   one man went along the bank of the River a fiew minutes and killed a beaver.   we have Sawn Great Sign of beaver for several days but more this day than usal.  the wind verry high & cold.    we proceeded on.  Saw a nomber of bufflaoe on the ridges and in the plains.   passed large bottoms of timber, & plains on each Side but no high hills.   passed a creek on the S.S.  Came 30 miles and Caped in a bottom on the N.S. after dark.   had passed a large creek on the N.S. which is two thousand miles from the mouth of the M.   2000ml. creek. [The streams are actually opposite to what Ordway reports. The stream on the south side, which was called 2000 Mile Creek by the party, is Redwater River.  The river on the north side, called Porcupine River by Lewis and Clark, is Poplar River. The party camped for the night above the latter.]

May 03, 1805
Patrick Gass

We proceeded on our voyage this morning, though very cold and disagreeable, and a severe frost. The snow and green grass on the prairies exhibited an appearance somewhat uncommon. The cotton wood leaves are as large as dollars, notwithstanding the snow and such hard frost.  We passed a small river on the north side called the 2000 mile river.  About a mile above we passed a large creek on the South side, called Porcupine creek.-- [Gass makes the same mistake as Ordway with regard to the two streams.  See Ordways entry for this day.]  We came this day about 20 miles and encamped on the North side.

May 03, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

clear but verry cold for this month.   we Set off about 7 oC & proceeded on    the Standing water was froze over in places, & froze to our poles as we were working along.   a white frost last night.   the Ground is covered with Snow.   the wind rose high from the west.   we halted about one oC. at a bottom covd. with timber on the N.S.  Capt Clark who walked on shore Since morning came to us had killed an Elk near   Some men went & brought it in.   one man went a Short distnce along the bank and Shot a beaver.    we have Saw Great Sign of beaver all day.   the wind cold & high.   we proceeded on   Saw a Great many vuffaloe on the ridges & plains.   the Snow is all gone this evening.   passed large bottoms & plains in the course of the day but no high hills.   passed a creek on the S.S.  [Whitehouse appears to have reversed the location of the two streams as did both Ordway and Gass.] Came 20 miles and Camped in a bottom on the N.S.   as were were a landing it being after dark Got the Irons broke off the red perogue, which the rudder hung on.   we passed a creek towards evening on the N.S. which came in at a sandbar.   I forgot it.

May 03, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

This morning we had Clear weather, but very Cold for the Season; We set out about 7 oClock A.M. and proceeded on, the Standing water froze last night, and the Water froze to our Setting poles, as we worked the Pettyaugers along, We had a severe white frost last night, and the ground cover'd with Snow,--  The wind rose & blew hard from the West, We stopped at 1 o'Clock P.M. in a bottom cover'd with Timber which lay on the North side of the River   Captain Clark who had walked on Shore since Morning, came to us here; he had killed an Elk, and  & party of Men were sent for it, and they brought it to us, one of our party, went a small distance, along the shore of the River; and shot a beaver, we saw great signs of beaver this day, the wind continued Cold, during the whole of this day, We proceeded on at 3 o'Clock P.M. and saw a great number of Buffalo, on the Ridges & in the plains, In the Evening, the Snow had all melted away; we passed some large bottoms & plains during the course of this day; but saw no high hills, we likewise passed a Creek, lying on the South side of the River, We came too, and encamped in a bottom on the North side of the River.  As We were landing it being after dark, we got the Irons broke of the <ridge poles> rudder, of one of the Pettyaugers.  Just before it was dark, we passed a Creek, lying on the South side of the River, which came into the River at a Sand barr.--  We came 20 Miles this day.--