April 25, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

the buffaloe Elk and Antelope are so gentle that we pass near them while feeding, without apearing to excite any alarm among them; and when we attract their attention, they frequently approach us more nearly to discover what we are, and in some instances pursue us a considerable distance apparenly with that view.

April 25, 1805
John Ordway

a clear cold morning.   the river rose 2 Inches last night.   we Set off eairly.   the wind blew from the N. one of the men caught a beaver last night.   we proceeded on    passed high land on N. S. and timbred bottom on S.S.  Sailed Some in a bend of the river.   came about 12 miles by 12 oClock.   the perogues could go no further as the wind blew them a head So that they halted for it to abate on the N.S.  Capt. Lewis myself and 3 more of the party crossed over to the S. Shore to go up by land to the Mouth of the river Roshjone or Yallow rock river [The French term is Roche Jaune, Yellowston, for the river of the same name which joins the Missouri near the North Dakota-Montana state line.] (for observations).   we walked along the high luffs, Saw a large gang of buffaloe in the botton.   we killed one young one and took our dinner of it and proceeded on.  Capt Lewis Shot a goose on hir nest    we got 6 eggs out of it, towards evening we killed 2 cow buffaloe and a calf in a handsom Smoth bottom below the mouth of Yallow Rock River.   we Camped on the bank of the yallow R. River, about 2 miles above its mouth.   little above the bottom on the Sand beach large & Small cottonwood & arsh in Sd. bottom

April 25, 1805
Patrick Gass

We set out as usual and had a fine day; but about 11 were obliged to halt again the wind was so strong ahead.  Captain Lewis and four men set off by land from this place to go to the river Jaune, or Yellow Stone river, which it is believed is not very distant.   I remarked, as a singular circumstance, that there is no dew in this Country, and very little rain. Can it be owing to the want of timber?  At 5 o'clock in the afternoon, we renewed our voyage; and having this day advanced about 13 miles, encamped on the South side. [Near Glass Bluffs, ND.]

April 25, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We set off early this morning, having fine Clear weather; about 11 oClock A.M. we had to come too, on account of the Wind being a head & blowing hard, Captain Lewis and 4 of our Men left us, having set out by land, in Order to go to the Mouth of the River roshjone [The Roche Jaune, in French, or Yellowstone.]; which lies higher up the Mesouri; & to where the confluence of both these great Rivers are.--  They took with them, Mathematical Instruments, in order to ssertain the Latitude of the River Roshjone, and were to waite there for our arrival.--  We proceeded on our Voyage at 10 o'Clock A.M. and went on till Evening, passing as we went along, fine level Priaries & some small Skirts of wood land, running close to the Bank of the River, We encamped on the South side of the River, having gone 13 Miles this day.--   The dew at this place never falls; and it seldom Rains, this we were told, by an Indian Women that was with us, that embark'd on board one of the Pettyaugers at the Mandan Nation with a frenchman her husband as our Interpreters to the Snake Indians.--