April 17, 1805
Meriwether Lewis

there were three beaver taken this morning by the party. the men prefer the flesh of this anamal, to that of any other which we have, or are able to procure at this moment. I eat very heartily of the beaver myself, and think it excellent; particularly the tale, and liver ...

April 17, 1805
John Ordway

a clear beautiful morning.   we Set off eairly.  Some of the men caught 2 beaver and Several Small fish.   a fair wind   we Sailed on    Saw large Gangs of buffaloe on the Side hills S.S.   proceeded on    passed a beautiful plain on the N.S.   passed Several bottoms on each Side of the River.   abt. 1 oClock we halted to dine   Saw a gang of buffaloe Swimming River.   one of the hunters killed one   Capt Lewis killed one large one in a fiew minutes they being poor we took only the tongues of them   Saw Several gangs of Elk on each Side of the River.   late in the afternoon we Saw a gang of buffaloe on S.S.  R. Potts [John Potts] killed one of them.   passed Several runs in the course of the day & red hills on each Side and high raged hills which re rought barron broken & Steep.   Came 26 miles this day by Sailing &.c.  Camped on a large Sand beach S.S.   one of the men caught a nomber of Small cat fish in the river.

April 17, 1805
Patrick Gass

We proceeded on early as usual with a fair wind.  The day was fine and we made good way.  Passed a beautiful plain and two large creeks on the North side, and another creek on the South.  We saw a great many buffaloe and elk on the banks.   At 1 o'clock we halted for dinner, when two men went out and in a few minutes killed 2 buffaloe.  We made 26 miles and encamped on the South side, and found that some rain had fallen during the day, where we encamped, though there was none where we had been.

April 17, 1805
Joseph Whitehouse

We got underway at the usual hour of day light, we proceeded on, and passed a high bluff to a sand barr, and a beautifull Priari, which put in near the River, likewise a Creek [Not mentioned by other members of the expedition.] that Runs a North Course under the Bluffs, and a small distance further passed two Creeks [The first Hall's Strand Creek, later Tobacco Creek. The second possibly Garden Creek.] lying on the same Side of the River; and one Creek [Clark Creek] lying on the South side.--  We encamped on the South side of the River, having come 26 Miles this day